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Curr Cardiol Rep. 2017 Aug 11;19(9):87. doi: 10.1007/s11886-017-0898-y.

Cardiovascular Disease, the Nitric Oxide Pathway and Risk of Cognitive Impairment and Dementia.

Author information

1
Institute of Health and Society and Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Newcastle University, Newcastle Biomedical Research Building, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, Newcastle upon Tyne,, NE4 5PL, UK. blossom.stephan@ncl.ac.uk.
2
Department of Rehabilitation, Aged and Extended Care, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, School of Health Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia.
3
Cognitive Ageing and Impairment Neurosciences Laboratory, School of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
4
Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle Biomedical Research Building, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, Newcastle upon Tyne,, NE4 5PL, UK.
5
Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Clinical Nutrition Department, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia.
6
Institute of Health and Society and Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Newcastle University, Newcastle Biomedical Research Building, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, Newcastle upon Tyne,, NE4 5PL, UK.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

In this review, we summarise the evidence on the association between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cognitive impairment and explore the role of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway as a causal mechanism.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Evidence from epidemiological studies suggests that the presence of CVD and its risk factors in midlife is associated with an increased risk of later life cognitive impairment and dementia. It is unclear what is driving this association but risk may be conveyed via an increase in neurodegeneration (e.g. amyloid deposition), vascular changes (e.g. small vessel disease) and mechanistically due to increased levels of oxidative stress and inflammation as well as changes in NO bioavailability. CVDs and dementia are major challenges to global health worldwide. The NO pathway may be a promising biological candidate for future studies focused on reducing not only CVD but also risk of cognitive decline and dementia.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular disease; Cognitive impairment; Dementia; Endothelial function; Nitric oxide

PMID:
28801790
PMCID:
PMC5554286
DOI:
10.1007/s11886-017-0898-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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