Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil. 2017 Nov 6;30(6):1245-1250. doi: 10.3233/BMR-169620.

Role of upper cervical spine in temporomandibular disorders.

Author information

1
Health Sciences Department, National University of Chimborazo, Riobamba, Ecuador.
2
Departamento de Medicina Física y Rehabilitación, Hidrología Médica, Facultad de Enfermería, Fisioterapia y Podología, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Clínico San Carlos (IdISSC), Spain.
3
Physiotherapy and Pain Group, University of Alcalá, Madrid, Spain.
4
Physiotherapy Department, University of Alcalá, Madrid, Spain.
5
Physiotherapy and Nursery Department, University of the Balearic Islands, Palma de Mallorca, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are prevalent multifactorial pathologies in which the actual role of the cervical region position is controversial.

OBJECTIVE:

To analyze the relationship between the position of the upper cervical rachis and the symptoms of TMD.

METHODS:

Sixty women were recruited to this study. All of them completed a questionnaire and were subjected to a temporomadibular exploration to create two different groups: a TMD Group (n= 30) - women who suffered TMD symptoms according to the evaluation; and a control group (n= 30) - women who were free from TMD symptoms. Two X-ray examinations were performed in all the women: a lateral one and a frontal one with mouth open to assess the C1-C0 distance and the craniocervical angle.

RESULTS:

ANOVA showed that the TMD and control women had similar C1-C0 distances and craniocervical angles (p> 0.05). Pearson correlation did not indicate any relationship between the craniocervical position and the symptomatology of TMD (r=- 0.070).

CONCLUSIONS:

TMD symptomatology is unrelated to alterations in craniocervical position (C0-C1 distance and craniocervical angle). Women with and without TMD showed a similar prevalence of alteration in the craniocervical position.

KEYWORDS:

Cervical vertebrae; temporomandibular joint disorders; upper cervical spine

PMID:
28800304
DOI:
10.3233/BMR-169620
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for IOS Press
Loading ...
Support Center