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Amyotroph Lateral Scler Frontotemporal Degener. 2017 Aug 11:1-5. doi: 10.1080/21678421.2017.1360355. [Epub ahead of print]

Nutrition management methods effective in increasing weight, survival time and functional status in ALS patients: a systematic review.

Author information

1
a Nutrition and Food Services , Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center , Cleveland , OH , USA.
2
b Department of Nutrition , Case Western Reserve University , Cleveland , OH , USA.
3
c Spinal Cord Injury Division , Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center , Cleveland , OH , USA , and.
4
d Department of Neurology , Case Western Reserve University , Cleveland , OH , USA.

Abstract

Poor prognosis and decreased survival time correlate with the nutritional status of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Various studies were reviewed which assessed weight, body mass index (BMI), survival time and ALS functional rating scale revised (ALSFRS-R) in order to determine the best nutrition management methods for this patient population. A systematic review was conducted using CINAHL, Medline, and PubMed, and various search terms in order to determine the most recent clinical trials and observational studies that have been conducted concerning nutrition and ALS. Four articles met criteria to be included in the review. Data were extracted from these articles and were inputted into the Data Extraction Tool (DET) provided by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND). Results showed that nutrition supplementation does promote weight stabilisation or weight gain in individuals with ALS. Given the low risk and low cost associated with intervention, early and aggressive nutrition intervention is recommended. This systematic review shows that there is a lack of high quality evidence regarding the efficacy of any dietary interventions for promoting survival in ALS or slowing disease progression; therefore more research is necessary related to effects of nutrition interventions.

KEYWORDS:

Lou Gehrig’s disease; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; medical nutrition therapy; nutrition; nutrition support

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