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Sci Rep. 2017 Aug 10;7(1):7794. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-08259-5.

Measurement of caveolin-1 densities in the cell membrane for quantification of caveolar deformation after exposure to hypotonic membrane tension.

Author information

1
Theoretical Biology Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, 351-0198, Japan. mtach@riken.jp.
2
MRC Toxicology Unit, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 9HN, UK, and Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), Kyoto University, Kyoto, 606-8501, Japan.
3
Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, 00014, Finland.
4
Graduate School of Information Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Ikoma, 630-0192, Japan.
5
Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Ikoma, 630-0192, Japan.
6
Theoretical Biology Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, 351-0198, Japan.
7
Core Research for Evolutionary Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, 332-0012, Japan.
8
Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Ikoma, 630-0192, Japan. suetsugu@bs.naist.jp.

Abstract

Caveolae are abundant flask-shaped invaginations of plasma membranes that buffer membrane tension through their deformation. Few quantitative studies on the deformation of caveolae have been reported. Each caveola contains approximately 150 caveolin-1 proteins. In this study, we estimated the extent of caveolar deformation by measuring the density of caveolin-1 projected onto a two-dimensional (2D) plane. The caveolin-1 in a flattened caveola is assumed to have approximately one-quarter of the density of the caveolin-1 in a flask-shaped caveola. The proportion of one-quarter-density caveolin-1 increased after increasing the tension of the plasma membrane through hypo-osmotic treatment. The one-quarter-density caveolin-1 was soluble in detergent and formed a continuous population with the caveolin-1 in the caveolae of cells under isotonic culture. The distinct, dispersed lower-density caveolin-1 was soluble in detergent and increased after the application of tension, suggesting that the hypo-osmotic tension induced the dispersion of caveolin-1 from the caveolae, possibly through flattened caveolar intermediates.

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