Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Gynecol Oncol. 2017 Oct;147(1):133-138. doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2017.07.144. Epub 2017 Aug 7.

Changes in inflammatory endometrial cancer risk biomarkers in individuals undergoing surgical weight loss.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Magee-Womens Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, 204 Craft Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, United States; Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, 130 De Soto Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, United States; University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, 5150 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15232, United States. Electronic address: linkfy@mail.magee.edu.
2
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Magee-Womens Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, 204 Craft Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, United States.
3
Department of Biostatistics, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, 130 De Soto Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, United States.
4
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Magee-Womens Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh, 204 Craft Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, United States; University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, 5150 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15232, United States.
5
Department of Medicine, and the Luminex Core Laboratory of the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, University of Pittsburgh, 5150 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15232, United States.
6
Division of Minimally Invasive and Bariatric Surgery, Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC, 300 Halket Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, United States.
7
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, 3811 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, United States; University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, 5150 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15232, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Obesity has been strongly linked to endometrial cancer (EC) risk. A number of potential EC risk biomarkers have been proposed, including heightened pro-inflammatory cytokines and adipokines. To evaluate if bariatric surgery can serve as a means for altering levels of such EC risk biomarkers, we investigated changes in these biomarkers after weight loss.

METHODS:

Blood samples were collected pre-operatively and 6months post-operatively in 107 female bariatric surgery patients aged 18-72years. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to compare biomarker levels (measured using xMAP immunoassays) pre- and post-surgery. Normative comparisons were implemented to contrast 6-month post-surgery biomarker levels to levels in a sample of 74 age-matched non-obese women. Linear regression was used to evaluate the relationship between biomarker expression at baseline and 6months post-surgery and the relationship between race and biomarker levels.

RESULTS:

On average, participants lost 30.15kg (SD: 12.26) after the bariatric intervention. Levels of C-peptide, insulin, CRP, leptin, IL-1Rα, and IL-6 significantly decreased, while levels of SHBG, IGFBP1, and adiponectin significantly increased with weight loss. Normative comparisons showed the levels of SHBG, C-peptide, insulin, IGFBP1, adiponectin, CRP, and TNFα after bariatric intervention approached the level of markers in comparison group. Multiple regression analyses revealed significant relationships between changes in BMI and changes in biomarker levels. The changes in IL-1Rα were significantly associated with race.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings demonstrate that normalization of EC risk biomarkers can be achieved with bariatric surgery. Improved understanding of biological mechanisms associated with weight loss may inform preventive strategies for EC.

KEYWORDS:

Bariatric surgery; Biomarkers; Endometrial cancer; Obesity; Weight loss

PMID:
28797697
DOI:
10.1016/j.ygyno.2017.07.144
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center