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J Therm Biol. 2017 Aug;68(Pt B):177-185. doi: 10.1016/j.jtherbio.2016.04.001. Epub 2016 Apr 7.

Heat stress is associated with disruption of ion balance in the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

Author information

1
Zoofysiologi, Aarhus Universitet, Institut for Bioscience, C.F. Mollers Aller 3, 8000 Aarhus C, Danmark; The University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
2
Zoofysiologi, Aarhus Universitet, Institut for Bioscience, C.F. Mollers Aller 3, 8000 Aarhus C, Danmark.
3
Zoofysiologi, Aarhus Universitet, Institut for Bioscience, C.F. Mollers Aller 3, 8000 Aarhus C, Danmark. Electronic address: Johannes.overgaard@bios.au.dk.

Abstract

Thermal tolerance is important in determining the spatial and temporal distributions of insects but the mechanisms which determine upper thermal limits remain poorly understood. In terrestrial insects heat tolerance is unlikely to be limited by oxygen supply but in some arthropods, heat stress has been shown to cause haemolymph hyperkalaemia which is known to have detrimental effects on neuromuscular excitability. It is however unresolved if heat-induced hyperkalemia is the cause or the result of cellular heat injury. To address the putative role of heat-induced hyperkalemia we quantified changes in ion and water balance in haemolymph and muscle tissue of the migratory locust during exposure to two static temperatures clustered around the CTmax (48°C and 50°C). We show that heat stress caused a loss of ion balance and severe haemolymph hyperkalaemia which coincided with the onset of heat stupor. Locusts were able to maintain their haemolymph volume throughout exposure, suggesting it is unlikely that osmoregulatory failure is responsible for haemolymph hyperkalaemia. When locusts were allowed to recover from heat stupor, they recovered ion balance quickly but were still unable to function optimally after 24h. The results therefore indicate that both the haemolymph hyperkalaemia and associated depression of muscular function (heat stupor) are secondary results of cellular heat injury and that the cause of heat stupor most be sought elsewhere.

KEYWORDS:

Cellular heat injury; Heat stress; Heat stupor; Muscle resting membrane potential; Potassium balance; Water balance

PMID:
28797478
DOI:
10.1016/j.jtherbio.2016.04.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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