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Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2017 Oct;296(4):811-817. doi: 10.1007/s00404-017-4472-z. Epub 2017 Aug 9.

Papillomavirus genotyping on formaldehyde fixed paraffin-embedded tissues in vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia.

Author information

1
Laboratoire Central d'Anatomie et Cytologie Pathologique, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nice, Hôpital Pasteur 1, pavillon L, 30 Avenue de la Voie Romaine, 06000, Nice, France. mazellier.s@chu-nice.fr.
2
Laboratoire Central d'Anatomie et Cytologie Pathologique, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nice, Hôpital Pasteur 1, pavillon L, 30 Avenue de la Voie Romaine, 06000, Nice, France.
3
Laboratoire de virologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nice, Hôpital l'Archet 2, 151 Route Saint-Antoine de Ginestière, 06200, Nice cedex 3, France.
4
Université de Nice-Sophia-Antipolis, UFR Médecine, Nice, France.
5
Service de dermatologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nice, Hôpital l'Archet 2, 151 Route Saint-Antoine de Ginestière, 06200, Nice cedex 3, France.
6
Service d'obstétrique, gynécologie, reproduction et médecine fœtale, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nice, Hôpital l'Archet 2, 151 Route Saint-Antoine de Ginestière, 06200, Nice cedex 3, France.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Few studies have described the epidemiology of human papillomavirus (HPV) in vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN). The aim of this study was to genotype HPV on formalin fixed paraffin-embedded tissues in VIN lesions.

METHODS:

A 5-year retrospective study was conducted by including all patients attending the teaching hospital of Nice with a diagnosis of VIN between 1st January 2010 and 31st December 2014. For all patients, HPV genotyping was performed with the PapilloCheck® microarray kit, routinely used on cervical cytology samples, and optimized for formaldehyde fixed paraffin-embedded tissues in VIN.

RESULTS:

Forty patients were included in the study: 39 patients had usual VIN and one presented with differentiated VIN. Among the 39 patients with usual VIN, the prevalence of HPV was 90% (35/39). Thirty-two patients had high grade VIN (82%) and seven low grade VIN (18%). In high grade VIN, the most represented HPV types were: HPV 16 (21/32 66%), HPV 56 (3/32 9%) and HPV 33 (2/32 6%). In low grade VIN, the most represented HPV types were: HPV 16 (4/7 57%) and HPV 6 (3/7 43%). Interestingly, 5/39 (13%) of patients diagnosed with usual VIN also had co-existing lichen sclerosus.

CONCLUSIONS:

We have optimized a HPV genotyping technique, routinely used on cervical cytology samples, and on paraffin fixed embedded tissue showing VIN. Moreover, we have identified five patients with lichen sclerosus co-existing with usual VIN. This association has rarely been reported and proves that these two entities can coexist.

KEYWORDS:

Epidemiology; Genotype; Lichen sclerosus; PapilloCheck; Papillomavirus; Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia

PMID:
28795241
DOI:
10.1007/s00404-017-4472-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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