Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biol Lett. 2017 Aug;13(8). pii: 20170241. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2017.0241.

Stable isotope analyses of feather amino acids identify penguin migration strategies at ocean basin scales.

Author information

1
Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA mpolito@lsu.edu.
2
Department of Biology, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA.
3
Antarctic Ecosystem Research Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
4
Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PS, UK.
5
Departamento Biología de Predadores Tope, Instituto Antártico Argentino, 25 de Mayo 1143, San Martín, Buenos Aires B1650CSP, Argentina.
6
Laboratorios Anexos, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Calle 64 N° 3, La Plata, Buenos Aires B1904AMA, Argentina.

Abstract

Identifying the at-sea distribution of wide-ranging marine predators is critical to understanding their ecology. Advances in electronic tracking devices and intrinsic biogeochemical markers have greatly improved our ability to track animal movements on ocean-wide scales. Here, we show that, in combination with direct tracking, stable carbon isotope analysis of essential amino acids in tail feathers provides the ability to track the movement patterns of two, wide-ranging penguin species over ocean basin scales. In addition, we use this isotopic approach across multiple breeding colonies in the Scotia Arc to evaluate migration trends at a regional scale that would be logistically challenging using direct tracking alone.

KEYWORDS:

geolocation; migration; seabird; stable isotopes

PMID:
28794274
PMCID:
PMC5582103
DOI:
10.1098/rsbl.2017.0241
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center