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EMBO Mol Med. 2017 Oct;9(10):1434-1447. doi: 10.15252/emmm.201707678.

mRNA mediates passive vaccination against infectious agents, toxins, and tumors.

Author information

1
CureVac AG, Tübingen, Germany.
2
Department of Infectious Disease and Global Health, Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA, USA.
3
Acuitas Therapeutics, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
4
CureVac AG, Tübingen, Germany thomas.schlake@curevac.com.

Abstract

The delivery of genetic information has emerged as a valid therapeutic approach. Various reports have demonstrated that mRNA, besides its remarkable potential as vaccine, can also promote expression without inducing an adverse immune response against the encoded protein. In the current study, we set out to explore whether our technology based on chemically unmodified mRNA is suitable for passive immunization. To this end, various antibodies using different designs were expressed and characterized in vitro and in vivo in the fields of viral infections, toxin exposure, and cancer immunotherapies. Single injections of mRNA-lipid nanoparticle (LNP) were sufficient to establish rapid, strong, and long-lasting serum antibody titers in vivo, thereby enabling both prophylactic and therapeutic protection against lethal rabies infection or botulinum intoxication. Moreover, therapeutic mRNA-mediated antibody expression allowed mice to survive an otherwise lethal tumor challenge. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates the utility of formulated mRNA as a potent novel technology for passive immunization.

KEYWORDS:

antibody; lipid nanoparticle; messenger RNA; mouse; passive immunization

PMID:
28794134
PMCID:
PMC5623855
DOI:
10.15252/emmm.201707678
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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