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Emerg Microbes Infect. 2017 Aug 9;6(8):e69. doi: 10.1038/emi.2017.59.

Zika virus replication in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus in Brazil.

Author information

1
Departamento de Entomologia, Instituto Aggeu Magalhães, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz), Recife 50760-420, Brazil.
2
Núcleo de Ciências da Vida, Centro Acadêmico do Agreste, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Caruaru 55002-970, Brazil.
3
Laboratório de Virologia e Terapia Experimental, Instituto Aggeu Magalhães, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz), Recife 50670-420, Brazil.
4
Núcleo de Estatística e Geoprocessamento, Instituto Aggeu Magalhães, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Fiocruz), Recife 50670-420, Brazil.
5
Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA.

Abstract

Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus that has recently been associated with an increased incidence of neonatal microcephaly and other neurological disorders. The virus is primarily transmitted by mosquito bite, although other routes of infection have been implicated in some cases. The Aedes aegypti mosquito is considered to be the main vector to humans worldwide; however, there is evidence that other mosquito species, including Culex quinquefasciatus, transmit the virus. To test the potential of Cx. quinquefasciatus to transmit ZIKV, we experimentally compared the vector competence of laboratory-reared Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus. Interestingly, we were able to detect the presence of ZIKV in the midgut, salivary glands and saliva of artificially fed Cx. quinquefasciatus. In addition, we collected ZIKV-infected Cx. quinquefasciatus from urban areas with high microcephaly incidence in Recife, Brazil. Corroborating our experimental data from artificially fed mosquitoes, ZIKV was isolated from field-caught Cx. quinquefasciatus, and its genome was partially sequenced. Collectively, these findings indicate that there may be a wider range of ZIKV vectors than anticipated.

PMID:
28790458
PMCID:
PMC5583667
DOI:
10.1038/emi.2017.59
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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