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Public Health Nutr. 2017 Nov;20(16):2887-2892. doi: 10.1017/S136898001700180X. Epub 2017 Aug 9.

Vitamin D supplementation and vitamin D status in children of immigrant background in Norway.

Author information

1
1Department of Community Medicine and Global Health,Institute of Health and Society,University of Oslo,Pb 1130 Blindern, 0318 Oslo,Norway.
2
2Vitas Analytical Services,Oslo Innovation Park,Norway.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Sufficient vitamin D status during infancy is important for child health and development. Several initiatives for improving vitamin D status among immigrant children have been implemented in Norway. The present study aimed to evaluate the vitamin D status and its determinants in children of immigrant background in Oslo.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study.

SETTING:

Child health clinics in Oslo.

SUBJECTS:

Healthy children with immigrant background (n 102) aged 9-16 months were recruited at the routine one-year check-up from two child health clinics with high proportions of immigrant clients. Blood samples were collected using the dried blood spot technique and analysed for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s-25(OH)D) concentration using LC-MS/MS.

RESULTS:

Mean s-25(OH)D was 52·3 (sd 16·7) nmol/l, with only three children below 25 nmol/l and none below 12·5 nmol/l. There was no significant gender, ethnic or seasonal variation in s-25(OH)D. However, compared with breast-fed children, s-25(OH)D concentration was significantly higher among children who were about 1 year of age and not breast-fed. About 38 % of the children were anaemic, but there was no significant correlation between s-25(OH)D and Hb (Pearson correlation, r=0·1, P=0·33).

CONCLUSIONS:

Few children in the study had vitamin D deficiency, but about 47 % of the children in the study population were under the recommended s-25(OH)D sufficiency level of ≥50 nmol/l.

KEYWORDS:

Breast-feeding; Children with immigrantbackground; Dried blood spot; Hb; Vitamin D

PMID:
28789713
DOI:
10.1017/S136898001700180X
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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