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Int J Mol Sci. 2017 Jul 28;18(8). pii: E1645. doi: 10.3390/ijms18081645.

Dietary Bioactive Diallyl Trisulfide in Cancer Prevention and Treatment.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA. michaelpuccinelli@gmail.com.
2
Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA. silviadstan@gmail.com.
3
Purdue University Center for Cancer Research, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA. silviadstan@gmail.com.

Abstract

Bioactive dietary agents have been shown to regulate multiple cancer hallmark pathways. Epidemiologic studies have linked consumption of Allium vegetables, such as garlic and onions, to decreased incidence of cancer. Diallyl trisulfide (DATS), a bioactive compound derived from Allium vegetables, has been investigated as an anti-cancer and chemopreventive agent. Preclinical studies provide ample evidence that DATS regulates multiple cancer hallmark pathways including cell cycle, apoptosis, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. DATS has been shown to arrest cancer cells at multiple stages of the cell cycle with the G2/M arrest being the most widely reported. Additionally, increased pro-apoptotic capacity as a result of regulating intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathway components has been widely reported following DATS treatment. Invasion, migration, and angiogenesis represent emerging targets of DATS and support its anti-cancer properties. This review summarizes DATS mechanisms of action as an anti-cancer and chemopreventive agent. These studies provide rationale for future investigation into its use as a cancer chemopreventive agent.

KEYWORDS:

Allium; cancer chemoprevention; diallyl trisulfide

PMID:
28788092
PMCID:
PMC5578035
DOI:
10.3390/ijms18081645
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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