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J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2017 Nov;75(11):2334-2339. doi: 10.1016/j.joms.2017.07.146. Epub 2017 Jul 15.

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Wound Dehiscence After Intraoral Bone Grafting in the Nonirradiated Patient: A Case Series.

Author information

1
Medical Doctor, Institute of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy, Hoogeveen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.h.j.hollander@umcg.nl.
2
Medical Director and Physician, Institute of Hyperbaric oxygen Therapy, Hoogeveen, The Netherlands.
3
Staff Member, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Wilhelmina Hospital, Assen, The Netherlands.
4
Staff Member, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, TREANT Scheper Hospital, Emmen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

In maxillofacial surgery, hyperbaric oxygen treatment is used almost exclusively as adjunctive therapy for osteoradionecrosis of the mandible in irradiated patients. It also is used to prevent the occurrence of osteoradionecrosis in the irradiated patient when dental surgery is indicated. Theoretically, hyperbaric oxygen therapy should benefit the nonirradiated patient in maxillofacial surgery (eg, patients with persistent intraoral wound dehiscences after bone grafting).

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Six nonirradiated patients underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy because of compromised wound healing after intraoral bone grafting of the maxilla as a preimplant procedure. All patients were treated 7 to 26 times with hyperbaric oxygen therapy at 2.5 ATA.

RESULTS:

All patients healed uneventfully. In retrospect, almost all patients had a history of chronic maxillary sinusitis or trauma to the operated area.

CONCLUSION:

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy seems to be an effective adjunctive therapy in the treatment of nonirradiated patients with compromised intraoral maxillary bone graft healing. Chronic maxillary sinus problems or a history of trauma could predispose to wound dehiscence after bone grafting.

PMID:
28784587
DOI:
10.1016/j.joms.2017.07.146
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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