Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Med Microbiol. 2017 Jul 27. pii: S1438-4221(17)30314-4. doi: 10.1016/j.ijmm.2017.07.007. [Epub ahead of print]

Identification of novel parasitophorous vacuole proteins in P. falciparum parasites using BioID.

Author information

1
Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Parasitology Section, Bernhard-Nocht-Straße 74, 20359 Hamburg, Germany.
2
Core Facility Mass Spectrometric Proteomics, Institute of Clinical Chemistry, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany.
3
Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Parasitology Section, Bernhard-Nocht-Straße 74, 20359 Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: spielmann@bni-hamburg.de.

Abstract

Malaria blood stage parasites develop within red blood cells where they are contained in a vacuolar compartment known as the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). This compartment holds a key role in the interaction of the parasite with its host cell. However, the proteome of this compartment has so far not been comprehensively analysed. Here we used BioID in asexual blood stages of the most virulent human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum to identify new proteins of the PV. The resulting proteome contained many of the already known PV proteins and validation by GFP-knock-in of 10 previously in P. falciparum uncharacterised hits revealed 5 new PV proteins and two with a partial PV localisation. This included proteins peripherally attached to the inner face of the PV membrane as well as proteins anchored in the parasite plasma membrane that protrude into the PV. Using selectable targeted gene disruption we generated mutants for 2 of the 10 candidates. In contrast we could not select parasites with disruptions for another 3 candidates, strongly suggesting that they are important for parasite growth. Interestingly, one of these included the orthologue of UIS2, a protein previously proposed to regulate protein translation in the parasite cytoplasm but here shown to be an essential PV protein. This work extends the number of known PV proteins and provides a starting point for further functional analyses of this compartment.

KEYWORDS:

BioID; Malaria; Parasitophorous vacuole; Plasmodium falciparum; Proteome

PMID:
28784333
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijmm.2017.07.007

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center