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Elife. 2017 Aug 8;6. pii: e25318. doi: 10.7554/eLife.25318.

Neurobehavioral evidence of interoceptive sensitivity in early infancy.

Author information

1
Lab of Action and Body, Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway University of London, Surrey, United Kingdom.
2
The Warburg Institute, School of Advanced Study, University of London, London, United Kingdom.
3
Department of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck University of London, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Interoception, the sensitivity to visceral sensations, plays an important role in homeostasis and guiding motivated behaviour. It is also considered to be fundamental to self-awareness. Despite its importance, the developmental origins of interoceptive sensitivity remain unexplored. We here provide the first evidence for implicit, flexible interoceptive sensitivity in 5 month old infants using a novel behavioural measure, coupled with an established cortical index of interoceptive processing. These findings have important implications for the understanding of the early developmental stages of self-awareness, self-regulation and socio-emotional abilities.

KEYWORDS:

cognitive development; emotion processing; heartbeat evoked potential; human; interoception; neuroscience

PMID:
28784203
PMCID:
PMC5548485
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.25318
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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