Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Meat Sci. 2017 Dec;134:124-127. doi: 10.1016/j.meatsci.2017.07.015. Epub 2017 Jul 22.

The effect of applying a rinse and chill procedure to lamb carcases immediately post-death on meat quality?

Author information

1
NSW Department of Primary Industries, Centre for Red Meat and Sheep Development, PO Box 129, Cowra, NSW 2794, Australia. Electronic address: steph.fowler@dpi.nsw.gov.au.
2
Department of Animal Sciences, Meat Science and Muscle Biology Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1805 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53706, USA.
3
NSW Department of Primary Industries, Centre for Red Meat and Sheep Development, PO Box 129, Cowra, NSW 2794, Australia.

Abstract

The current study examined the effect of vascular rinsing lamb carcases (Rinse & Chill®) with a commercially available isotonic substrate solution (98.5% water; balance: glucose, polyphosphates, and maltose) at 14°C. Thirty, lamb carcases were randomly allocated to receive either the solution (n=15) 25 min post slaughter on a slaughter line or no solution (n=15). There was no apparent effect on the rate of pH decline due to infusion or muscle shortening of the M. longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LL), but there was a more than 50% reduction in toughness (lower shear force) of the LL due to infusion. Infusion resulted in lighter (L*), yellower (b*) LL and this effect was maintained during simulated colour display. There was no impact on redness (a*) of the LL and in fact a critical consumer threshold for redness was not breached on average for infused or non-infused LL. There was no evidence of elevated levels of metmyoglobin formation or lipid oxidation.

KEYWORDS:

Lipid oxidation; Meat colour; Tenderness; Water holding capacity

PMID:
28783608
DOI:
10.1016/j.meatsci.2017.07.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center