Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Prog Neurobiol. 2017 Oct;157:2-28. doi: 10.1016/j.pneurobio.2017.07.006. Epub 2017 Aug 4.

Impact of aging immune system on neurodegeneration and potential immunotherapies.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Membrane Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100101, PR China.
2
First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou City, Zhejiang Province, 325000, PR China.
3
First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou City, Zhejiang Province, 325000, PR China; Department of Cell Biology & Immunology, and Department of Pharmacology & Neuroscience, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, 76107, USA.
4
Department of Cell Biology & Immunology, and Department of Pharmacology & Neuroscience, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, 76107, USA. Electronic address: dongming.su@unthsc.edu.
5
State Key Laboratory of Membrane Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100101, PR China. Electronic address: zhaoy@ioz.ac.cn.

Abstract

The interaction between the nervous and immune systems during aging is an area of avid interest, but many aspects remain unclear. This is due, not only to the complexity of the aging process, but also to a mutual dependency and reciprocal causation of alterations and diseases between both the nervous and immune systems. Aging of the brain drives whole body systemic aging, including aging-related changes of the immune system. In turn, the immune system aging, particularly immunosenescence and T cell aging initiated by thymic involution that are sources of chronic inflammation in the elderly (termed inflammaging), potentially induces brain aging and memory loss in a reciprocal manner. Therefore, immunotherapeutics including modulation of inflammation, vaccination, cellular immune therapies and "protective autoimmunity" provide promising approaches to rejuvenate neuroinflammatory disorders and repair brain injury. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries linking the aging immune system with the development of neurodegeneration. Additionally, we discuss potential rejuvenation strategies, focusing aimed at targeting the aging immune system in an effort to prevent acute brain injury and chronic neurodegeneration during aging.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Immune system; Immunotherapy; Inflammation; Neurodegeneration

PMID:
28782588
DOI:
10.1016/j.pneurobio.2017.07.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center