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Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2017 Sep 30;491(4):1040-1046. doi: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2017.08.007. Epub 2017 Aug 3.

Implications of coordinated cell-body rotations for Leptospira motility.

Author information

1
Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi, 980-8579, Japan.
2
Graduate School of Frontier BioSciences, Osaka University, 1-3 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871, Japan.
3
Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi, 980-8579, Japan. Electronic address: naka@bp.apph.tohoku.ac.jp.

Abstract

The spirochete Leptospira has a coiled cell body and two periplasmic flagella (PFs) that reside beneath the outer sheath. PFs extend from each end of the cell body and are attached to the right-handed spiral protoplasmic cylinder (PC) via a connection with the flagellar motor embedded in the inner membrane. PFs bend each end of the cell body into left-handed spiral (S) or planar hook (H) shapes, allowing leptospiral cells to swim using combined anterior S-end and posterior H-end gyrations with PC rotations. As a plausible mechanism for motility, S- and H-end gyrations by PFs and PC rotations by PF countertorque imply mutual influences among the three parts. Here we show a correlation between H-end gyration and PC rotation from the time records of rotation rates and rotational directions of individual swimming cells. We then qualitatively explain the observed correlation using a simple rotation model based on the measurements of motility and intracellular arrangements of PFs revealed by cryo-electron microscopy and electron cryotomography.

KEYWORDS:

Bacterial motility; Cross-correlation; Leptospira; Spirochete

PMID:
28780349
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbrc.2017.08.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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