Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Psychiatry Res. 2017 Sep;255:457-464. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.05.002.

Challenging mental health related stigma in China: Systematic review and meta-analysis. II. Interventions among people with mental illness.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry II, University of Ulm and BKH Günzburg, Ulm, Germany. Electronic address: ziyanxzy@gmail.com.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
3
Department of Psychiatry II, University of Ulm and BKH Günzburg, Ulm, Germany.
4
Department of Psychiatry II, University of Ulm and BKH Günzburg, Ulm, Germany. Electronic address: nicolas.ruesch@uni-ulm.de.

Abstract

People with mental illness often face different types of mental illness stigma that may affect their lives, including perceived stigma, self-stigma, harmful coping strategies and poor quality of life. Although anti-stigma interventions for people with mental illness from Western countries have been identified by recent systematic reviews, their efficacy in China is unknown. This review evaluates the efficacy of anti-stigma interventions among people with mental illness in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Macau. A systematic search of 8 electronic databases in English and Chinese yielded 17 randomized and non-randomized controlled trials. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) were calculated wherever possible. Psychoeducation was the most commonly used intervention. SMDs were large and significant for perceived/experienced/anticipated stigma, self-prejudice and coping with stigma, as well as for depression and anxiety symptoms and quality of life. Both Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and psychoeducation had positive effects on perceived/experienced/anticipated stigma. The quality of studies was modest and heterogeneity across studies was high. Anti-stigma interventions demonstrated promise to reduce stigma's negative impact on people with mental illness in China, but more high-quality intervention research is needed.

KEYWORDS:

Chinese people; Interventions; Perceived stigma; Self-stigma; Systematic review

PMID:
28780128
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2017.05.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center