Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2017 Aug 4;7(1):7343. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-07566-1.

Epigenetic regulation of starvation-induced autophagy in Drosophila by histone methyltransferase G9a.

Author information

1
Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871, Japan.
2
Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto, 606-8585, Japan.
3
The Center for Advanced Insect Research Promotion, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto, 606-8585, Japan.
4
Departmetnt of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama, 226-8501, Japan.
5
Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871, Japan. fukusaki@bio.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp.
6
Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto, 606-8585, Japan. myamaguc@kit.ac.jp.
7
The Center for Advanced Insect Research Promotion, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto, 606-8585, Japan. myamaguc@kit.ac.jp.

Abstract

Epigenetics is now emerging as a key regulation in response to various stresses. We herein identified the Drosophila histone methyltransferase G9a (dG9a) as a key factor to acquire tolerance to starvation stress. The depletion of dG9a led to high sensitivity to starvation stress in adult flies, while its overexpression induced starvation stress resistance. The catalytic domain of dG9a was not required for starvation stress resistance. dG9a plays no apparent role in tolerance to other stresses including heat and oxidative stresses. Metabolomic approaches were applied to investigate global changes in the metabolome due to the loss of dG9a during starvation stress. The results obtained indicated that dG9a plays an important role in maintaining energy reservoirs including amino acid, trehalose, glycogen, and triacylglycerol levels during starvation. Further investigations on the underlying mechanisms showed that the depletion of dG9a repressed starvation-induced autophagy by controlling the expression level of Atg8a, a critical gene for the progression of autophagy, in a different manner to that in cancer cells. These results indicate a positive role for dG9a in starvation-induced autophagy.

PMID:
28779125
PMCID:
PMC5544687
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-07566-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center