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J Neuroimmunol. 2017 Oct 15;311:35-39. doi: 10.1016/j.jneuroim.2017.07.014. Epub 2017 Jul 23.

Soluble membrane attack complex in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of HIV-infected individuals, relationship to HIV RNA, and comparison with HIV negatives.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States. Electronic address: aande2@emory.edu.
2
Department of Microbiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL, United States.
3
Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States.
4
Emory University School of Nursing, Atlanta, GA, United States.
5
Department of Psychiatry, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States.
6
Department of Psychiatry, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States; Department of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA, United States.

Abstract

The soluble membrane attack complex (sMAC) represents the terminal product of the complement cascade. We enrolled 47 HIV+ adults (12 of whom underwent a second visit at least 24weeks after starting therapy) as well as 11 HIV negative controls. At baseline, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sMAC was detectable in 27.7% of HIV+ individuals. CSF sMAC correlated with CSF HIV RNA levels and was more likely to be detectable in HIV+ individuals on cART compared to HIV negative controls. In HIV+ participants, there were negative association trends between sMAC and neurocognitive performance but these did not reach statistical significance.

KEYWORDS:

Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; Complement; Human immunodeficiency virus; Membrane attack complex; Neurocognitive disorder

PMID:
28774464
PMCID:
PMC5682931
DOI:
10.1016/j.jneuroim.2017.07.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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