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Radiol Clin North Am. 2017 Sep;55(5):1085-1102. doi: 10.1016/j.rcl.2017.04.012. Epub 2017 Jun 12.

Imaging in Osteoarthritis.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Quantitative Imaging Center, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118, USA; Department of Radiology, Yale New Haven Health at Bridgeport Hospital, 267 Grant Street, Bridgeport, CT 06610, USA.
2
Department of Radiology, Quantitative Imaging Center, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118, USA; Department of Radiology, University of Erlangen-Nuremburg, Maximiliansplatz 2, 91054 Erlangen, Germany.
3
Department of Radiology, Quantitative Imaging Center, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118, USA; Department of Radiology, Mercy Catholic Medical Center, 1500 Lansdowne Avenue, Darby, PA 19023, USA.
4
Department of Radiology, Quantitative Imaging Center, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118, USA. Electronic address: guermazi@bu.edu.

Abstract

With technologic advances and the availability of sophisticated computer software and analytical strategies, imaging plays an increasingly important role in understanding the disease process of osteoarthritis (OA). Radiography has limitations in that it can visualize only limited features of OA, such as osteophytes and joint space narrowing, but remains the most commonly used modality for establishing an imaging-based diagnosis of OA. This article describes the roles and limitations of different imaging modalities and discusses the optimum imaging protocol, imaging diagnostic criteria of OA, differential diagnoses, and what the referring physician needs to know.

KEYWORDS:

Bone marrow; Cartilage; Imaging; Knee; MR imaging; Meniscus; Osteoarthritis; Radiography

PMID:
28774450
DOI:
10.1016/j.rcl.2017.04.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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