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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2017 Aug 8;70(6):766-775. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2017.06.012.

Overcoming the Roadblocks to Cardiac Cell Therapy Using Tissue Engineering.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York.
2
Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
3
Lillehei Heart Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
4
Department of Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin.
5
Department of Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida.
6
Department of Medicine, Emory University, and Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
7
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.
8
Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Disease, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
9
Center for Pharmacogenomics, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.
10
Institute of Molecular Cardiology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky.
11
Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. Electronic address: jayzhang@uab.edu.

Abstract

Transplantations of various stem cells or their progeny have repeatedly improved cardiac performance in animal models of myocardial injury; however, the benefits observed in clinical trials have been generally less consistent. Some of the recognized challenges are poor engraftment of implanted cells and, in the case of human cardiomyocytes, functional immaturity and lack of electrical integration, leading to limited contribution to the heart's contractile activity and increased arrhythmogenic risks. Advances in tissue and genetic engineering techniques are expected to improve the survival and integration of transplanted cells, and to support structural, functional, and bioenergetic recovery of the recipient hearts. Specifically, application of a prefabricated cardiac tissue patch to prevent dilation and to improve pumping efficiency of the infarcted heart offers a promising strategy for making stem cell therapy a clinical reality.

KEYWORDS:

biocompatible materials; heart failure; myocardial infarction; myocardium; stem cells

PMID:
28774384
PMCID:
PMC5553556
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2017.06.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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