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BMC Health Serv Res. 2017 Aug 3;17(1):518. doi: 10.1186/s12913-017-2456-0.

Perspectives of policy and political decision makers on access to formal dementia care: expert interviews in eight European countries.

Author information

1
Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Institute of Health and Nursing Sciences, Magdeburger Straße 8, D-06112, Halle (Saale), Germany. anja.broda@medizin.uni-halle.de.
2
Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Institute of Health and Nursing Sciences, Magdeburger Straße 8, D-06112, Halle (Saale), Germany.
3
Dublin City University, School of Nursing and Human Sciences, Dublin, Ireland.
4
IRCCS S. Giovanni di Dio "Fatebenefratelli", Brescia, Italy.
5
Alzheimer Center Limburg, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
6
Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Ageing and Health, Vestfold Hospital Trust, Oslo, Norway.
7
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
8
CEDOC, Chronic Diseases Research Center, Nova Medical School/Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.
9
Aging Research Center (ARC), Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
10
Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
11
Bangor University, Dementia Services Development Centre, Bangor, UK.
12
Nottingham University, Institute of Mental Health, Nottingham, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

As part of the ActifCare (ACcess to Timely Formal Care) project, we conducted expert interviews in eight European countries with policy and political decision makers, or representatives of relevant institutions, to determine their perspectives on access to formal care for people with dementia and their carers.

METHODS:

Each ActifCare country (Germany, Ireland, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Sweden, United Kingdom) conducted semi-structured interviews with 4-7 experts (total N = 38). The interview guide addressed the topics "Complexity and Continuity of Care", "Formal Services", and "Public Awareness". Country-specific analysis of interview transcripts used an inductive qualitative content analysis. Cross-national synthesis focused on similarities in themes across the ActifCare countries.

RESULTS:

The analysis revealed ten common themes and two additional sub-themes across countries. Among others, the experts highlighted the need for a coordinating role and the necessity of information to address issues of complexity and continuity of care, demanded person-centred, tailored, and multidisciplinary formal services, and referred to education, mass media and campaigns as means to raise public awareness.

CONCLUSIONS:

Policy and political decision makers appear well acquainted with current discussions among both researchers and practitioners of possible approaches to improve access to dementia care. Experts described pragmatic, realistic strategies to influence dementia care. Suggested innovations concerned how to achieve improved dementia care, rather than transforming the nature of the services provided. Knowledge gained in these expert interviews may be useful to national decision makers when they consider reshaping the organisation of dementia care, and may thus help to develop best-practice strategies and recommendations.

KEYWORDS:

Access to formal dementia care; Dementia; Expert interviews

PMID:
28774307
PMCID:
PMC5543593
DOI:
10.1186/s12913-017-2456-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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