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Thromb Haemost. 2017 Oct 5;117(10):1859-1867. doi: 10.1160/TH17-03-0174. Epub 2017 Aug 3.

Superoxide Dismutase 2 is dispensable for platelet function.

Author information

1
E. Dale Abel, MB.BS., DPhil., Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, 4312 PBDB, 169 Newton Road, Iowa City, IA 52242-1101, USA, Tel.: +1 (319) 353 3050, Fax: +1 (319) 335 3865, E-mail: DRCadmin@uiowa.edu.

Abstract

Increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) promote platelet activation. The sources of platelet-derived ROS are diverse and whether or not mitochondrial derived ROS, modulates platelet function is incompletely understood. Studies of platelets from patients with sickle cell disease, and diabetes suggest a correlation between mitochondrial ROS and platelet dysfunction. Therefore, we generated mice with a platelet specific knockout of superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2-KO) to determine if increased mitochondrial ROS increases platelet activation. SOD2-KO platelets demonstrated decreased SOD2 activity and increased mitochondrial ROS, however total platelet ROS was unchanged. Mitochondrial function and content were maintained in non-stimulated platelets. However SOD2-KO platelets demonstrated decreased mitochondrial function following thrombin stimulation. In vitro platelet activation and spreading was normal and in vivo, deletion of SOD2 did not change tail-bleeding or arterial thrombosis indices. In pathophysiological models mediated by platelet-dependent immune mechanisms such as sepsis and autoimmune inflammatory arthritis, SOD2-KO mice were phenotypically identical to wildtype controls. These data demonstrate that increased mitochondrial ROS does not result in platelet dysfunction.

KEYWORDS:

ROS; Thrombosis; mitochondria; platelet physiology

PMID:
28771279
PMCID:
PMC5894334
DOI:
10.1160/TH17-03-0174
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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