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Nutrients. 2017 Aug 3;9(8). pii: E831. doi: 10.3390/nu9080831.

Vitamin C Status Correlates with Markers of Metabolic and Cognitive Health in 50-Year-Olds: Findings of the CHALICE Cohort Study.

Author information

1
Biostatistics and Computational Biology Unit, University of Otago, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand. john.pearson@otago.ac.nz.
2
Department of Pathology, University of Otago, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand. juliet.pullar@otago.ac.nz.
3
Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand. renee.wilson@postgrad.otago.ac.nz.
4
Department of Psychological Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand. janet.spittlehouse@otago.ac.nz.
5
Department of Pathology, University of Otago, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand. margreet.vissers@otago.ac.nz.
6
Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand. paula.skidmore@otago.ac.nz.
7
Lipid & Diabetes Research Group, Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand. jinny.willis@cdhb.health.nz.
8
Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand. vicky.cameron@otago.ac.nz.
9
Department of Pathology, University of Otago, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand. anitra.carr@otago.ac.nz.

Abstract

A cohort of 50-year-olds from Canterbury, New Zealand (N = 404), representative of midlife adults, undertook comprehensive health and dietary assessments. Fasting plasma vitamin C concentrations (N = 369) and dietary vitamin C intake (N = 250) were determined. The mean plasma vitamin C concentration was 44.2 µmol/L (95% CI 42.4, 46.0); 62% of the cohort had inadequate plasma vitamin C concentrations (i.e., <50 µmol/L), 13% of the cohort had hypovitaminosis C (i.e., <23 µmol/L), and 2.4% had plasma vitamin C concentrations indicating deficiency (i.e., <11 µmol/L). Men had a lower mean plasma vitamin C concentration than women, and a higher percentage of vitamin C inadequacy and deficiency. A higher prevalence of hypovitaminosis C and deficiency was observed in those of lower socio-economic status and in current smokers. Adults with higher vitamin C levels exhibited lower weight, BMI and waist circumference, and better measures of metabolic health, including HbA1c, insulin and triglycerides, all risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Lower levels of mild cognitive impairment were observed in those with the highest plasma vitamin C concentrations. Plasma vitamin C showed a stronger correlation with markers of metabolic health and cognitive impairment than dietary vitamin C.

KEYWORDS:

HbA1c; ascorbate; cognition; glucose; hypovitaminosis C; insulin

PMID:
28771190
PMCID:
PMC5579624
DOI:
10.3390/nu9080831
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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