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J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Feb;33(2):404-410. doi: 10.1111/jgh.13908.

Dietary behaviors in relation to prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome in adolescent girls.

Author information

1
Student Research Committee, Department of Nutrition, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.
2
Cardiovascular Research Center, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.
3
Department of Oncology, Division of Palliative Care Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
4
Community Medicine, Community Medicine Department, Medical School, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, Sabzevar, Iran.
5
Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, Shahrekord, Iran.
6
Metabolic Syndrome Research Center, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.
7
Division of Medical Education, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, UK.
8
Department of Modern Sciences and Technologies, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

Abstract

BACKGROUNDS AND AIMS:

There is limited evidence regarding the relationship between dietary behaviors and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This study aimed to explore the association between diet-related practices and prevalence of IBS.

METHODS:

The study was conducted among 988 adolescent girls living in Iran. Dietary behaviors were pre-defined and assessed in nine domains using a pre-tested questionnaire. To investigate the association between diet-related practices and the presence of IBS, this study used logistic regression analysis in crude and adjusted models.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of IBS was 16.9% in this population. Compared with individuals who did not consume fluid with their meal, those who always consumed fluid with meals had a greater chance of IBS (odds ratio [OR]: 2.91; P: 0.01). This study found a direct relationship between a greater intake of spicy food and IBS prevalence (OR: 5.28; P: 0.02). The individuals who ate fried foods every day also had a greater risk of IBS compared with those who did not consume fried foods (OR: 1.65; P: 0.01). The subjects who had lost ≥ 5 teeth had 2.23 times greater odds for IBS than the individual who had lost ≤ 1 tooth (OR: 2.23; P: 0.01) was a significant inverse relationship between the chewing sufficiency and the risk of IBS (OR: 4.04; P: 0.02). These associations remained significant after controlling for potential confounder.

CONCLUSIONS:

Intra-meal fluid intake, chewing insufficiency, higher tooth loss, and the consumption of spicy and fried food were associated with increased risk of IBS. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

KEYWORDS:

chewing; dietary habits; fluid intake; irritable bowel syndrome; spicy food; tooth loss

PMID:
28770579
DOI:
10.1111/jgh.13908
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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