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Cell Metab. 2017 Aug 1;26(2):279-280. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2017.07.002.

Chronic Sucralose or L-Glucose Ingestion Does Not Suppress Food Intake.

Author information

1
Charles Perkins Centre and School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia; Dr. John and Anne Chong Lab for Functional Genomics, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia.
2
Charles Perkins Centre and School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia.
3
Neuroscience Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia.
4
Charles Perkins Centre and School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia; Dr. John and Anne Chong Lab for Functional Genomics, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2006, Australia. Electronic address: greg.neely@sydney.edu.au.

Abstract

Despite widespread consumption of non-nutritive sweeteners (NNSs), the impact of manipulating the perceived sweetness of food is unclear. Previously we reported that chronic consumption of the NNSs sucralose or L-glucose led to increased calories consumed post-exposure; however, a recent study suggested this effect occurs because NNSs acutely suppress food intake, leading to a caloric debt. Here we show that acute ingestion of sucralose in the context of a low-carbohydrate diet causes a pronounced increase in calories consumed. Moreover, neither sucralose nor L-glucose had a lasting effect on food intake during chronic exposure; however, both NNSs enhance food intake post-exposure. Together these data confirm that sucralose and L-glucose promote food intake under a variety of experimental conditions.

PMID:
28768164
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmet.2017.07.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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