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PLoS One. 2017 Aug 2;12(8):e0180891. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0180891. eCollection 2017.

Salivary flow and xerostomia in older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Author information

1
Dental School Undergraduation and Graduation Programs, University of Fortaleza - Unifor, Fortaleza, Brazil.
2
Dental School, University of Fortaleza - Unifor, Fortaleza, Brazil.
3
Dental School Graduation Program, University of Fortaleza - Unifor, Fortaleza, Brazil.
4
Public Health Graduation Program, University of Fortaleza - Unifor, Fortaleza, Brazil.
5
Dental Care Department, Rouen University Hospital, Saint Julien Hospital, Rouen, France.
6
Department of Internal Medicine, Geriatrics and Therapeutics, Saint Julien Hospital, Rouen University Hospital, Rouen, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To assess salivary flow in older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and its association with xerostomia.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional clinical study conducted with older patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for at least one year receiving treatment at the Integrated Center for Diabetes and Hypertension of Ceará (CIHD) in the city of Fortaleza, Ceará, Northeastern Brazil. Oral clinical examination was carried out to assess the decayed, missing and filled teeth index (DMFT). Perception of the presence of xerostomia/dry mouth was assessed using the Visual Analogue Scale. Stimulated salivary flow was measured and samples were obtained using an extra-soft silicone device.

RESULTS:

120 older patients with diabetes (60 insulin-dependent and 60 non-insulin-dependent) aged 65-91 years, with a mean age of 72.26 ± 6.53 years, were assessed. Of these, 111 (92.5%) presented a decrease in salivary flow while 59 (49.2%) reported moderate to severe xerostomia/dry mouth. The DMFT Index presented a mean of 27.53 ± 4.86 teeth.

CONCLUSIONS:

Reduced salivary flow was found in the group assessed in the present research; however, this finding is not in accordance with the perception of xerostomia/dry mouth reported by the patients.

PMID:
28767676
PMCID:
PMC5540406
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0180891
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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