Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Dent Educ. 2017 Aug;81(8):eS153-eS161. doi: 10.21815/JDE.017.022.

Dental Education Required for the Changing Health Care Environment.

Author information

1
Dr. Fontana is Professor, University of Michigan School of Dentistry; Dr. González-Cabezas is Richard Christiansen Collegiate Professor of Oral and Craniofacial Global Initiatives and Associate Professor, University of Michigan School of Dentistry; Dr. de Peralta is Clinical Associate Professor, University of Michigan School of Dentistry; and Dr. Johnsen is Dean and Professor, University of Iowa College of Dentistry & Dental Clinics. mfontan@umich.edu.
2
Dr. Fontana is Professor, University of Michigan School of Dentistry; Dr. González-Cabezas is Richard Christiansen Collegiate Professor of Oral and Craniofacial Global Initiatives and Associate Professor, University of Michigan School of Dentistry; Dr. de Peralta is Clinical Associate Professor, University of Michigan School of Dentistry; and Dr. Johnsen is Dean and Professor, University of Iowa College of Dentistry & Dental Clinics.

Abstract

To be able to meet the demands for care in 2040, dental graduates will need to address challenges resulting from the rapidly changing health care environment with knowledge and sets of skills to build on current standards and adapt to the future. The purposes of this article are to 1) analyze key challenges likely to evolve considerably between now and 2040 that will impact dental education and practice and 2) propose several sets of skills and educational outcomes necessary to address these challenges. The challenges discussed include changes in prevalence of oral diseases, dental practice patterns, materials and technologies, integrated medical-dental care, role of electronic health records, cultural competence, integrated curricula, interprofessional education, specialty-general balance, and web/cloud-based collaborations. To meet these challenges, the dental graduate will need skills such as core knowledge in basic and clinical dentistry, technical proficiency, critical thinking skills for lifelong learning, ethical and professional values, ability to manage a practice, social responsibility, and ability to function in a collegial intra- and interprofessional setting. Beyond the skills of the individual dentist will be the need for leadership in academia and the practice community. Academic and professional leaders will need to engage key constituencies to develop strategic directions and agendas with all parties pointed toward high standards for individual patients and the public at large. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21st Century."

KEYWORDS:

curriculum; dental education; education outcomes; skills

PMID:
28765467
DOI:
10.21815/JDE.017.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center