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World Neurosurg. 2017 Jul 29. pii: S1878-8750(17)31219-6. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2017.07.119. [Epub ahead of print]

The effect of stereoscopic anaglyphic 3-dimensional video didactics on learning neuroanatomy.

Author information

1
University of California Davis Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, 4860 Y St., Suite 3740, Sacramento, CA 95817, United States of America. Electronic address: agoodmd@protonmail.com.
2
University of Arizona, Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Tucson Arizona, United States of America. Electronic address: sam352@mail.harvard.edu.
3
University of California Davis Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, 4860 Y St., Suite 3740, Sacramento, CA 95817, United States of America. Electronic address: darrinjlee@gmail.com.
4
University of California Davis Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, 4860 Y St., Suite 3740, Sacramento, CA 95817, United States of America. Electronic address: fgirgis@ucdavis.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The teaching of neuroanatomy in medical education has historically been based on didactic instruction, cadaveric dissections, and intra-operative experience for students. Multiple novel 3-Dimensional (3D) modalities have recently emerged. Among these, stereoscopic anaglyphic video is easily accessible and affordable, however, its effects have not yet formally been investigated.

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to investigate if 3D stereoscopic anaglyphic video instruction in neuroanatomy could improve learning for content-naive students, as compared to 2D video instruction.

METHODS:

A single-site controlled prospective case control study was conducted at the School of Education. Content knowledge was assessed at baseline, followed by the presentation of an instructional neuroanatomy video. Participants viewed the video in either 2D or 3D format, then completed a written test of skull base neuroanatomy. Pre-test and post-test performances were analyzed with independent t-tests and ANCOVA.

RESULTS:

249 subjects completed the study. At baseline, the 2D (n=124, F=97) and 3D groups (n=125, F=96) were similar, although the 3D group was older by 1.7 years (p=.0355) and the curricula of participating classes differed (p<.0001). Average scores for the 3D group were higher for both pretest (2D, M=19.9%, SD=12.5% vs. 3D, M=23.9%, SD=14.9%, p=.0234) and posttest (2D, M=68.5%, SD=18.6% vs. 3D, M=77.3%, SD=18.8%, p=.003), but the magnitude of improvement across groups did not reach statistical significance (2D, M=48.7%, SD=21.3%, vs. 3D, M=53.5%, SD=22.7%, p=.0855).

CONCLUSION:

Incorporation of 3D video instruction into curricula without careful integration is insufficient to promote learning over 2D video.

KEYWORDS:

3D; anatomy; education; medical; multimedia; neuroanatomy; stereoscopic

PMID:
28765017
DOI:
10.1016/j.wneu.2017.07.119
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