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Sci Rep. 2017 Jul 31;7(1):6889. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-05930-9.

Ethylene, an early marker of systemic inflammation in humans.

Author information

1
Department of Tumor Immunology, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
2
Intensive Care Medicine, Nijmegen Institute for Infection, Inflammation and Immunity, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
3
Radboud Center for Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Molecular and Laser Physics, Institute of Molecules and Materials, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
6
Department of Anaesthesia, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust, Harefield, UK.
7
Section of Anaesthesia, Pain Medicine and Intensive Care, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK.
8
Department of Molecular and Laser Physics, Institute of Molecules and Materials, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. s.cristescu@science.ru.nl.

Abstract

Ethylene is a major plant hormone mediating developmental processes and stress responses to stimuli such as infection. We show here that ethylene is also produced during systemic inflammation in humans and is released in exhaled breath. Traces of ethylene were detected by laser spectroscopy both in vitro in isolated blood leukocytes exposed to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as well as in vivo following LPS administration in healthy volunteers. Exposure to LPS triggers formation of ethylene as a product of lipid peroxidation induced by the respiratory burst. In humans, ethylene was detected prior to the increase of blood levels of inflammatory cytokines and stress-related hormones. Our results highlight that ethylene release is an early and integral component of in vivo lipid peroxidation with important clinical implications as a breath biomarker of bacterial infection.

PMID:
28761087
PMCID:
PMC5537290
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-05930-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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