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J Sci Med Sport. 2018 Apr;21(4):433-438. doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2017.07.010. Epub 2017 Jul 14.

Assessment and monitoring practices of Australian fitness professionals.

Author information

1
Physically Active Lifestyles Group (USQ PALs), Institute for Resilient Regions, University of Southern Queensland, Australia; Active Living and Public Health Program, Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL), Victoria University, Australia. Electronic address: jason.bennie@usq.edu.au.
2
Active Living and Public Health Program, Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL), Victoria University, Australia.
3
KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Department of Kinesiology, Physical Activity, Sports and Health Research Group, Belgium.
4
Active Living and Public Health Program, Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL), Victoria University, Australia; Federation University Australia, Faculty of Health, Australia.
5
Physically Active Lifestyles Group (USQ PALs), Institute for Resilient Regions, University of Southern Queensland, Australia; Active Living and Public Health Program, Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL), Victoria University, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Assessment and monitoring of client health and fitness is a key part of fitness professionals' practices. However, little is known about prevalence of this practice. This study describes the assessment/monitoring practices of a large sample of Australian fitness professionals.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional.

METHODS:

In 2014, 1206 fitness professionals completed an online survey. Respondents reported their frequency (4 point-scale: [1] 'never' to [4] 'always') of assessment/monitoring of eight health and fitness constructs (e.g. body composition, aerobic fitness). This was classified as: (i) 'high' ('always' assessing/monitoring ≥5 constructs); (ii) 'medium' (1-4 constructs); (iii) 'low' (0 constructs). Classifications are reported by demographic and fitness industry characteristics. The odds of being classified as a 'high assessor/monitor' according to social ecological correlates were examined using a multiple-factor logistic regression model.

RESULTS:

Mean age of respondents was 39.3 (±11.6) years and 71.6% were female. A total of 15.8% (95% CI: 13.7%-17.9%) were classified as a 'high' assessor/monitor. Constructs with the largest proportion of being 'always' assessed were body composition (47.7%; 95% CI: 45.0%-50.1%) and aerobic fitness (42.5%; 95% CI: 39.6%-45.3%). Those with the lowest proportion of being 'always' assessed were balance (24.0%; 95% CI: 24.7%-26.5%) and mental health (20.2%; 95% CI: 18.1%-29.6%). A perceived lack of client interest and fitness professionals not considering assessing their responsibility were associated with lower odds of being classified as a 'high assessor/monitor'.

CONCLUSIONS:

Most fitness professionals do not routinely assess/monitor client fitness and health. Key factors limiting client health assessment and monitoring include a perceived lack of client interest and professionals not considering this their role.

KEYWORDS:

Aerobic fitness; Neuromotor fitness; Personal trainers; Strength training

PMID:
28760692
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsams.2017.07.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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