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Neuron. 2017 Aug 16;95(4):791-807.e7. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2017.07.011. Epub 2017 Jul 27.

Precision Functional Mapping of Individual Human Brains.

Author information

1
VISN 17 Center of Excellence for Research on Returning War Veterans, Waco, TX, 76711, USA; Center for Vital Longevity, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, TX, 75235, USA. Electronic address: evan.gordon@va.gov.
2
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA. Electronic address: laumannt@wustl.edu.
3
Laboratory of Brain and Cognition, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA; Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, 63130, USA.
4
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA; Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
6
Department of Psychology, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA.
7
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA; Program in Occupational Therapy, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
8
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
9
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA; Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
10
Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA; Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, 63130, USA.
11
Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
12
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA; Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA; Department of Neuroscience, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
13
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA; Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA; Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, 63130, USA; Department of Neuroscience, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, 63130, USA; Department of Neurological Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
14
VISN 17 Center of Excellence for Research on Returning War Veterans, Waco, TX, 76711, USA; Center for Vital Longevity, School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, TX, 75235, USA; Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76789, USA. Electronic address: steven.nelson1@va.gov.
15
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA; Program in Occupational Therapy, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA. Electronic address: ndosenbach@wustl.edu.

Abstract

Human functional MRI (fMRI) research primarily focuses on analyzing data averaged across groups, which limits the detail, specificity, and clinical utility of fMRI resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) and task-activation maps. To push our understanding of functional brain organization to the level of individual humans, we assembled a novel MRI dataset containing 5 hr of RSFC data, 6 hr of task fMRI, multiple structural MRIs, and neuropsychological tests from each of ten adults. Using these data, we generated ten high-fidelity, individual-specific functional connectomes. This individual-connectome approach revealed several new types of spatial and organizational variability in brain networks, including unique network features and topologies that corresponded with structural and task-derived brain features. We are releasing this highly sampled, individual-focused dataset as a resource for neuroscientists, and we propose precision individual connectomics as a model for future work examining the organization of healthy and diseased individual human brains.

KEYWORDS:

brain networks; fMRI; functional connectivity; individual variability; myelin mapping

PMID:
28757305
PMCID:
PMC5576360
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2017.07.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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