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Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Sep;24(27):21693-21699. doi: 10.1007/s11356-017-9710-1. Epub 2017 Jul 29.

Anxiety-like behavioural effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field in rats.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Sciences, State University of Novi Pazar, Vuka Karadzica bb, Novi Pazar, 36300, Serbia. natasadj@np.ac.rs.
2
Institute of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Science, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac, Serbia.
3
Faculty of engineering, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac, Serbia.

Abstract

In recent years, extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) has received considerable attention for its potential biological effects. Numerous studies have shown the role of ELF-EMF in behaviour modulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of short-term ELF-EMF (50 Hz) in the development of anxiety-like behaviour in rats through change hypothalamic oxidative stress and NO. Ten adult male rats (Wistar albino) were divided in two groups: control group-without exposure to ELF-EMF and experimental group-exposed to ELF-EMF during 7 days. After the exposure, time open field test and elevated plus maze were used to evaluate the anxiety-like behaviour of rats. Upon completion of the behavioural tests, concentrations of superoxide anion (O2·-), nitrite (NO2-, as an indicator of NO) and peroxynitrite (ONOO-) were determined in the hypothalamus of the animals. Obtained results show that ELF-EMF both induces anxiety-like behaviour and increases concentrations of O2·- and NO, whereas it did not effect on ONOO- concentration in hypothalamus of rats. In conclusion, the development of anxiety-like behaviour is mediated by oxidative stress and increased NO concentration in hypothalamus of rats exposed to ELF-EMF during 7 days.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety; Electromagnetic field; Hypothalamus; Nitric oxide; Oxidative stress

PMID:
28756602
DOI:
10.1007/s11356-017-9710-1
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