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J Dairy Sci. 2017 Oct;100(10):7751-7770. doi: 10.3168/jds.2016-12512. Epub 2017 Jul 26.

Invited review: A systematic review and qualitative analysis of treatments other than conventional antimicrobials for clinical mastitis in dairy cows.

Author information

1
Département de Sciences Cliniques, Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire, Université de Montréal, C.P. 5000, St-Hyacinthe, QC, J2S 7C6, Canada.
2
Département de Sciences Cliniques, Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire, Université de Montréal, C.P. 5000, St-Hyacinthe, QC, J2S 7C6, Canada; Canadian Bovine Mastitis and Milk Quality Research Network, C.P. 5000, St-Hyacinthe, QC, J2S 7C6, Canada.
3
Valacta, 555 Boul. des Anciens-Combattants, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC, H9X 3R4, Canada.
4
Canadian Bovine Mastitis and Milk Quality Research Network, C.P. 5000, St-Hyacinthe, QC, J2S 7C6, Canada; Sherbrooke Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 2000. Collège, Sherbrooke, QC, J1M 0C8, Canada.
5
Canadian Bovine Mastitis and Milk Quality Research Network, C.P. 5000, St-Hyacinthe, QC, J2S 7C6, Canada; Département de Pathologie et Microbiologie, Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire, Université de Montréal, C.P. 5000, St-Hyacinthe, QC, J2S 7C6, Canada. Electronic address: simon.dufour@umontreal.ca.

Abstract

Clinical mastitis is an important disease in dairies. Its treatment is mainly based on the use of antimicrobial drugs. Numerous non-antimicrobial drugs and treatment strategies have already been reported for clinical mastitis treatment, but data on their efficacy have never been collated in a systematic way. The objective of this systematic review was to identify treatments other than conventional antimicrobials for the treatment of clinical mastitis in lactating dairy cows. A systematic review was performed with studies written in English or French selected from CAB Abstracts, PubMed, and Web of Science from January 1970 to June 2014. Controlled clinical trials, observational studies, and experimental challenges were retained. Lactating dairy cows with clinical mastitis were the participant of interest. All treatments other than conventional antimicrobials for clinical mastitis during lactation were retained. Only studies comparing the treatment under investigation to a negative or positive control, or both, were included. Outcomes evaluated were clinical and bacteriological cure rates and milk production. Selection of the study, data extraction, and assessment of risk of bias was performed by 3 reviewers. Assessment of risk of bias was evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration tool for systematic review of interventions. A total of 2,451 manuscripts were first identified and 39 manuscripts corresponding to 41 studies were included. Among these, 22 were clinical trials, 18 were experimental studies, and 1 was an observational study. The treatments evaluated were conventional anti-inflammatory drugs (n = 14), oxytocin with or without frequent milk out (n = 5), biologics (n = 9), homeopathy (n = 5), botanicals (n = 4), probiotics (n = 2), and other alternative products (n = 2). All trials had at least one unclear or high risk of bias. Most trials (n = 13) did not observe significant differences in clinical or bacteriological cure rates in comparison with negative or positive controls. Few studies evaluated the effect of treatment on milk yield. In general, the power of the different studies was very low, thus precluding conclusions on noninferiority or nonsuperiority of the treatments investigated. No evidence-based recommendations could be given for the use of an alternative or non-antimicrobial conventional treatment for clinical mastitis. However, probiotics and oxytocin with or without frequent milk out should not be recommended. We concluded that homeopathic treatments are not efficient for management of clinical mastitis.

KEYWORDS:

clinical mastitis; lactating dairy cow; non-antimicrobial therapy; systematic review

PMID:
28755947
DOI:
10.3168/jds.2016-12512
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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