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Sci Rep. 2017 Jul 28;7(1):6754. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-07004-2.

Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased incidence of subclinical hypothyroidism - A Cohort Study.

Author information

1
Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
3
Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
4
Institute for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disease, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, Texas, USA.
5
Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. yukangtu@ntu.edu.tw.

Abstract

Prior cross-sectional analyses have demonstrated an association between subclinical hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome and selected components. However, the temporal relation between metabolic syndrome and declining thyroid function remains unclear. In a prospective study, an unselected cohort of 66,822 participants with and without metabolic syndrome were followed. A proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for hypothyroidism. Exploratory analyses for the relation between components of metabolic syndrome and declining thyroid function were also undertaken. During an average follow-up of 4.2 years, the incident rates for subclinical hypothyroidism were substantially higher in participants who began the study with metabolic syndrome compared with metabolically normal controls. After controlling for risk factors, patients with metabolic syndrome were at a 21% excess risk of developing subclinical hypothyroidism (adjusted HR 1.21; 95% CI 1.03-1.42). When individual components were analyzed, an increased risk of subclinical hypothyroidism was associated with high blood pressure (1.24; 1.04-1.48) and high serum triglycerides (1.18; 1.00-1.39), with a trend of increasing risk as participants had additional more components. Individuals with metabolic syndrome are at a greater risk for developing subclinical hypothyroidism, while its mechanisms and temporal consequences of this observation remain to be determined.

PMID:
28754977
PMCID:
PMC5533753
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-07004-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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