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J Leukoc Biol. 2017 Oct;102(4):1143-1151. doi: 10.1189/jlb.5A1016-445R. Epub 2017 Jul 28.

Elastase inhibitors as potential therapies for ELANE-associated neutropenia.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
2
Severe Chronic Neutropenia International Registry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; and.
3
Stemgenics, Inc., Seattle, Washington, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; dcdale@uw.edu.

Abstract

Mutations in ELANE, the gene for neutrophil elastase (NE), a protease expressed early in neutrophil development, are the most frequent cause of cyclic (CyN) and severe congenital neutropenia (SCN). We hypothesized that inhibitors of NE, acting either by directly inhibiting enzymatic activity or as chaperones for the mutant protein, might be effective as therapy for CyN and SCN. We investigated β-lactam-based inhibitors of human NE (Merck Research Laboratories, Kenilworth, NJ, USA), focusing on 1 inhibitor called MK0339, a potent, orally absorbed agent that had been tested in clinical trials and shown to have a favorable safety profile. Because fresh, primary bone marrow cells are rarely available in sufficient quantities for research studies, we used 3 cellular models: patient-derived, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs); HL60 cells transiently expressing mutant NE; and HL60 cells with regulated expression of the mutant enzyme. In all 3 models, the cells expressing the mutant enzyme had reduced survival as measured with annexin V and FACS. Coincubation with the inhibitors, particularly MK0339, promoted cell survival and increased formation of mature neutrophils. These studies suggest that cell-permeable inhibitors of neutrophil elastase show promise as novel therapies for ELANE-associated neutropenia.

KEYWORDS:

congenital neutropenia; cyclic neutropenia; neutrophil elastase

PMID:
28754797
PMCID:
PMC5597518
DOI:
10.1189/jlb.5A1016-445R
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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