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Cancer Gene Ther. 2017 Sep;24(9):386-392. doi: 10.1038/cgt.2017.30. Epub 2017 Jul 28.

MicroRNA-140-5p inhibits invasion and angiogenesis through targeting VEGF-A in breast cancer.

Lu Y1,2, Qin T3,2, Li J3,2, Wang L3, Zhang Q3, Jiang Z3, Mao J3,2.

Author information

1
Teaching Laboratory of Morphology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, China.
2
Key Laboratory of Tumor Stem Cell Research of Liaoning Province, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, China.
3
Department of Pathology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, China.

Abstract

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been proven to be involved in cell metastasis and angiogenesis by interaction with the target mRNAs. Evidence has been confirmed that miR-140-5p is a tumor suppressor in human cancers such as breast cancer. However, the potential molecular mechanism of miR-140-5p in breast cancer invasion and angiogenesis is still poorly understood. According to our study, we reported that miR-140-5p inhibited the tumor invasion and angiogenesis of breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo by targeting VEGF-A. The mRNA amount of miR-140-5p was decreased in the breast cancer clinical samples and breast cancer with metastasis compared with the corresponding adjacent normal tissues and cancer without metastasis. MiR-140-5p mimics and a negative control were transfected into human MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Transwell chambers were used to detect the invasive ability of the cells, and the angiogenic ability was assessed by tube-formation assay. The markers of invasion and angiogenesis, VEGF-A, CD31 and MMP-9, were detected by using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis in vivo. VEGF-A was verified as a possible target gene of miR-140-5p, and corroborated by dual-luciferase reporter and ELISA. Taken together, the study elucidates the molecular mechanisms by which miR-140-5p inhibits breast cancer metastasis and angiogenesis, and provides a potent evidence for the development of a novel microRNA-targeting anticancer strategy for breast cancer patients.

PMID:
28752859
PMCID:
PMC5668497
DOI:
10.1038/cgt.2017.30
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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