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Sci Rep. 2017 Jul 27;7(1):6664. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-06235-7.

Anti-obesity and anti-inflammatory effects of synthetic acetic acid vinegar and Nipa vinegar on high-fat-diet-induced obese mice.

Author information

1
Biotechnology Research Centre, Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI), Serdang, Selangor, 43400, Malaysia.
2
Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.
3
Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, 43400, Malaysia.
4
China-ASEAN College of Marine Sciences, Xiamen University Malaysia, Jalan Sunsuria, Bandar Sunsuria, 43900, Sepang, Selangor, Malaysia.
5
Department of Agriculture Genetics and Breeding, College of Agriculture and Applied Biology, Cantho University, Can Tho, 84071, Vietnam.
6
BioEasy Sdn Bhd, Setia Alam, Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia.
7
School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Jalan Broga, 43500, Semenyih, Selangor, Malaysia.
8
Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia. noorjahan@upm.edu.my.
9
Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, 43400, Malaysia. noorjahan@upm.edu.my.

Abstract

Recently, food-based bioactive ingredients, such as vinegar, have been proposed as a potential solution to overcome the global obesity epidemic. Although acetic acid has been identified as the main component in vinegar that contributes to its anti-obesity effect, reports have shown that vinegar produced from different starting materials possess different degrees of bioactivity. This study was performed to compare the anti-obesity and anti-inflammatory effects of synthetic acetic acid vinegar and Nipa vinegar in mice fed a high-fat diet. In this work, mice were fed a high-fat diet for 33 weeks. At the start of week 24, obese mice were orally fed synthetic acetic acid vinegar or Nipa vinegar (0.08 and 2 ml/kg BW) until the end of week 33. Mice fed a standard pellet diet served as a control. Although both synthetic acetic acid vinegar and Nipa vinegar effectively reduced food intake and body weight, a high dose of Nipa vinegar more effectively reduced lipid deposition, improved the serum lipid profile, increased adipokine expression and suppressed inflammation in the obese mice. Thus, a high dose of Nipa vinegar may potentially alleviate obesity by altering the lipid metabolism, inflammation and gut microbe composition in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice.

PMID:
28751642
PMCID:
PMC5532206
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-06235-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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