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Am J Med. 2017 Dec;130(12):1408-1414.e6. doi: 10.1016/j.amjmed.2017.06.027. Epub 2017 Jul 24.

Lifestyle Risk Factors Increase the Risk of Hospitalization for Sciatica: Findings of Four Prospective Cohort Studies.

Author information

1
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: rahman.shiri@ttl.fi.
2
Oulu Center for Cell-Matrix Research, Biocenter and Department of Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Center for Life Course Health Research, University of Oulu, and Medical Research Center Oulu, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
3
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland; Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
4
Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
5
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
6
Center for Life Course Health Research, University of Oulu, and Medical Research Center Oulu, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
7
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
8
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine and the Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
9
LIKES Research Centre for Physical Activity and Health, Jyväskylä, Finland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of lifestyle risk factors on the risk of hospitalization for sciatica and to determine whether overweight or obesity modifies the effect of leisure-time physical activity on hospitalization for sciatica.

METHODS:

We included 4 Finnish prospective cohort studies (Health 2000 Survey, Mobile Clinic Survey, Helsinki Health Study, and Young Finns Study) consisting of 34,589 participants and 1259 hospitalizations for sciatica during 12 to 30 years of follow-up. Sciatica was based on hospital discharge register data. We conducted a random-effects individual participant data meta-analysis.

RESULTS:

After adjustment for confounding factors, current smoking at baseline increased the risk of subsequent hospitalization for sciatica by 33% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13%-56%), whereas past smokers were no longer at increased risk. Obesity defined by body mass index increased the risk of hospitalization for sciatica by 36% (95% CI 7%-74%), and abdominal obesity defined by waist circumference increased the risk by 41% (95% CI 3%-93%). Walking or cycling to work reduced the risk of hospitalization for sciatica by 33% (95% CI 4%-53%), and the effect was independent of body weight and other leisure activities, while other types of leisure activities did not have a statistically significant effect.

CONCLUSIONS:

Smoking and obesity increase the risk of hospitalization for sciatica, whereas walking or cycling to work protects against hospitalization for sciatica. Walking and cycling can be recommended for the prevention of sciatica in the general population.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise; Hospitalization; Obesity; Sciatica; Smoking

PMID:
28750940
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjmed.2017.06.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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