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BMC Res Notes. 2017 Jul 27;10(1):337. doi: 10.1186/s13104-017-2688-4.

Pharmacology education and antibiotic self-medication among medical students: a cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Allied Sciences, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka, Saliyapura, Sri Lanka. rathishdeva@gmail.com.
2
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Allied Sciences, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka, Saliyapura, Sri Lanka.
3
Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Allied Sciences, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka, Saliyapura, Sri Lanka.
4
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Allied Sciences, Rajarata University of Sri Lanka, Saliyapura, Sri Lanka.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Pharmacology teaches rational prescribing. Self-medication among medical students is recognised as a threat to rational prescribing. Antibiotic self-medication could cause antibiotic resistance among medical students. We aimed to find an association between pharmacology education and antibiotic self-medication.

RESULTS:

Overall, 39% [(110/285) 95% CI 32.9-44.3] of students were found to have antibiotic self-medication. The percentage for antibiotic self-medication progressively increased with the year of study. The percentage of antibiotic self-medication was significantly high in the "Formal Pharmacology Education" group (47%-77/165) in comparison to the "No Formal Pharmacology Education" group (28%-33/120) (P = 0.001032). Overall, the most common self-prescribed antibiotic was amoxicillin (56%-62/110).

KEYWORDS:

Antibiotics; Medical education; Medical undergraduates; Pharmacology; Self-medication

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