Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2017 Nov;42(11):1232-1235. doi: 10.1139/apnm-2017-0322. Epub 2017 Aug 24.

Increasing age is a major risk factor for susceptibility to heat stress during physical activity.

Author information

1
a Human and Environmental Physiological Research Unit, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa; Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada.
2
b Human and Environmental Physiological Research Unit, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada.
3
c Departments of Medicine, Cardiac Sciences, and Community Health Sciences, Faculties of Medicine and Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada.
4
d Human and Environmental Physiological Research Unit, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada.
5
e Faculty of Human Kinetics, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC J1K 0A5, Canada.
6
f FAME Laboratory, Department of Exercise Science, University of Thessaly, Trikala 382 21, Greece.
7
g Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada.

Abstract

We evaluated the extent to which age, cardiorespiratory fitness, and body fat can independently determine whole-body heat loss (WBHL) in 87 otherwise healthy adults. We show that increasing age is a major predictor for decreasing WBHL in otherwise healthy adults (aged 20-70 years), accounting for 40% of the variation in the largest study to date. While greater body fat also had a minor detrimental impact on WBHL, there was no significant role for cardiorespiratory fitness.

KEYWORDS:

aging; body fat; cardiorespiratory fitness; condition cardiorespiratoire; exposition à la chaleur; gras corporel; heat exposure; older adults; personnes âgées; thermoregulation; thermorégulation; vieillissement

PMID:
28750177
DOI:
10.1139/apnm-2017-0322
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center