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PLoS Genet. 2017 Jul 27;13(7):e1006852. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1006852. eCollection 2017 Jul.

The population genomics of archaeological transition in west Iberia: Investigation of ancient substructure using imputation and haplotype-based methods.

Author information

1
Smurfit Institute of Genetics, School of Genetics and Microbiology, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
2
Research Centre for Anthropology and Health, Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
3
The Irish Fieldschool of Prehistoric Archaeology, Department of Archaeology, NUI Galway, Galway, Ireland.
4
Department of Genetics & Evolution - Anthropology Unit, University of Geneva, Switzerland.
5
Palimpsesto - Estudo e Preservação do Património Cultural Lda., Coimbra, Portugal.
6
Palaeogenetics Group, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany.
7
Workgroup on Ancient Peasant Societies, University of Lisbon Archaeological Center, Lisboa, Portugal.
8
Nucleo de Investigação Arqueologica - ERA Arqueologia, Cruz Quebrada, Portugal.
9
Interdisciplinary Center for Archaeology and Evolution of Human Behavior - University of Algarve, Faro, Portugal.
10
Laboratory of Forensic Anthropology, Centre for Functional Ecology, Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, Calçada Martim de Freitas, Coimbra, Portugal.

Abstract

We analyse new genomic data (0.05-2.95x) from 14 ancient individuals from Portugal distributed from the Middle Neolithic (4200-3500 BC) to the Middle Bronze Age (1740-1430 BC) and impute genomewide diploid genotypes in these together with published ancient Eurasians. While discontinuity is evident in the transition to agriculture across the region, sensitive haplotype-based analyses suggest a significant degree of local hunter-gatherer contribution to later Iberian Neolithic populations. A more subtle genetic influx is also apparent in the Bronze Age, detectable from analyses including haplotype sharing with both ancient and modern genomes, D-statistics and Y-chromosome lineages. However, the limited nature of this introgression contrasts with the major Steppe migration turnovers within third Millennium northern Europe and echoes the survival of non-Indo-European language in Iberia. Changes in genomic estimates of individual height across Europe are also associated with these major cultural transitions, and ancestral components continue to correlate with modern differences in stature.

PMID:
28749934
PMCID:
PMC5531429
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pgen.1006852
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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