Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Oral Microbiol. 2017 Jun 12;9(1):1324725. doi: 10.1080/20002297.2017.1324725. eCollection 2017.

16S rDNA analysis of periodontal plaque in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and periodontitis patients.

Author information

1
Department of Dentistry, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, P.R. China.
2
Department of Dentistry, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, P.R. China.
3
Department of Infectious Diseases, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, P.R. China.

Abstract

This study investigated if chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is correlated with periodontitis via periodontal microbiota and if certain bacteria affect periodontitis as well as COPD. Moreover, the study investigated whether suffering from COPD is associated with a decrease in the richness and diversity of periodontal microbiota. Subgingival plaque was obtained from 105 patients. Bacterial DNA was isolated from 55 COPD and 50 non-COPD participants (either with or without periodontitis). 16S rRNA gene metagenomic sequencing was used to characterize the microbiota and to determine taxonomic classification. In the non-periodontitis patients, suffering from COPD resulted in a decrease in bacteria richness and diversity in the periodontal microenvironment. An increase in the genera Dysgonomonas, Desulfobulbus, and Catonella and in four species (Porphyromonas endodontalis, Dysgonomonas wimpennyi, Catonella morbi, and Prevotella intermedia) in both COPD and periodontitis patients suggests that an increase in these periodontitis-associated microbiota may be related to COPD. Three genera (Johnsonella, Campylobacter, and Oribacterium) were associated with COPD but not with periodontitis. The decrease in the genera Arcanobacterium, Oribacterium, and Streptomyces in COPD patients implies that these genera may be health-associated genera, and the decrease in these genera may be related to disease. These data support the hypothesis that COPD is correlated with periodontitis via these significantly changed specific bacteria.

KEYWORDS:

16s rRNA gene; Oral microbiota; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; chronic periotontal disease; high-throughput sequencing; subgingival plaque

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center