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J Pediatr. 2017 Aug;187:253-257. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.05.006. Epub 2017 Jun 1.

Incidence of Biliary Atresia and Timing of Hepatoportoenterostomy in the United States.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD. Electronic address: perri.c.hopkins.mil@mail.mil.
2
MedStar Georgetown Transplant Institute, Washington, DC.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the incidence, trends, seasonality, and age at the time of hepatoportoenterostomy (Kasai procedure) for biliary atresia in the US.

STUDY DESIGN:

The triennial Health Cost and Utilization Project-Kids' Inpatient Database for 1997-2012 was used to perform a retrospective analysis of biliary atresia in the US. Infants aged <1 year of age with a diagnosis of biliary atresia who underwent a Kasai procedure were included. Nationwide infant population data were used to calculate incidence and evaluate trends. Age at the time of the Kasai procedure and the seasonality of biliary atresia were evaluated as well.

RESULTS:

The incidence of biliary atresia in the US was 4.47 per 100 000 and was higher in females (risk ratio [RR], 1.43; 95% CI, 1.27-1.62), Asian/Pacific Islanders (RR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.44-2.47), and blacks (RR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.06-1.58) compared with whites. The incidence of biliary atresia increased by an average of 7.9% per year from 1997 to 2012 (P <.001). The median age at the time of the Kasai procedure was 63 days, with no improvement over the study period (P = .64). There was no evidence of seasonality (P = .69).

CONCLUSION:

The incidence of biliary atresia has increased over the past 15 years, with the median age at the time of the Kasai procedure now outside the optimal window. Implementation of systematic screening measures for biliary atresia in the US are needed.

PMID:
28746031
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.05.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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