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Curr Microbiol. 2017 Nov;74(11):1261-1269. doi: 10.1007/s00284-017-1311-1. Epub 2017 Jul 25.

UV-C Adaptation of Shigella: Morphological, Outer Membrane Proteins, Secreted Proteins, and Lipopolysaccharides Effects.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Wastewater Treatment and Valorization, Water Research and Technology Centre, Technopole of Borj-Cédria, BP 273, Soliman, 8020, Tunisia. chourabi.kalthoum@gmail.com.
2
Department of Genetics and Microbiology, Autonomous University of Barcelona, 08290, Barcelona, Spain.
3
Laboratory of Wastewater Treatment and Valorization, Water Research and Technology Centre, Technopole of Borj-Cédria, BP 273, Soliman, 8020, Tunisia.
4
Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Sciences of Bizerte, Carthage University, Zarzouna, 7021, Tunisia.

Abstract

Water UV disinfection remains extremely important, particularly in developing countries where drinking and reclaimed crop irrigation water may spread devastating infectious diseases. Enteric bacterial pathogens, among which Shigella, are possible contaminants of drinking and bathing water and foods. To study the effect of UV light on Shigella, four strains were exposed to different doses in a laboratory-made irradiation device, given that the ultraviolet radiation degree of inactivation is directly related to the UV dose applied to water. Our results showed that the UV-C rays are effective against all the tested Shigella strains. However, UV-C doses appeared as determinant factors for Shigella eradication. On the other hand, Shigella-survived strains changed their outer membrane protein profiles, secreted proteins, and lipopolysaccharides. Also, as shown by electron microscopy transmission, morphological alterations were manifested by an internal cytoplasm disorganized and membrane envelope breaks. Taken together, the focus of interest of our study is to know the adaptive mechanism of UV-C resistance of Shigella strains.

KEYWORDS:

Bacteria; Morphology; Outer membrane; Survival; UV dose

PMID:
28744569
DOI:
10.1007/s00284-017-1311-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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