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J Biomed Opt. 2017 Jul 1;22(7):70502. doi: 10.1117/1.JBO.22.7.070502.

Intracellular imaging of docosanol in living cells by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

Author information

1
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Urbana, Illinois, United StatesbUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Bioengineering, Urbana, Illinois, United States.
2
GlaxoSmithKline, King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, United States.
3
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Urbana, Illinois, United States.
4
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Urbana, Illinois, United StatesbUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Bioengineering, Urbana, Illinois, United StatesdUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Urbana, Illinois, United StateseUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Internal Medicine, Urbana, Illinois, United States.

Abstract

Docosanol is an over-the-counter topical agent that has proved to be one of the most effective therapies for treating herpes simplex labialis. However, the mechanism by which docosanol suppresses lesion formation remains poorly understood. To elucidate its mechanism of action, we investigated the uptake of docosanol in living cells using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. Based on direct visualization of the deuterated docosanol, we observed highly concentrated docosanol inside living cells 24 h after drug treatment. In addition, different spatial patterns of drug accumulation were observed in different cell lines. In keratinocytes, which are the targeted cells of docosanol, the drug molecules appeared to be docking at the periphery of the cell membrane. In contrast, the drug molecules in fibroblasts appeared to accumulate in densely packed punctate regions throughout the cytoplasm. These results suggest that this molecular imaging approach is suitable for the longitudinal tracking of drug molecules in living cells to identify cell-specific trafficking and may also have implications for elucidating the mechanism by which docosanol suppresses lesion formation.

PMID:
28742922
DOI:
10.1117/1.JBO.22.7.070502
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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