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PLoS One. 2017 Jul 24;12(7):e0181940. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0181940. eCollection 2017.

Biochemical characterization and comparison of aspartylglucosaminidases secreted in venom of the parasitoid wasps Asobara tabida and Leptopilina heterotoma.

Author information

1
Unité "Ecologie et Dynamique des Systèmes Anthropisés" (EDYSAN, FRE 3498 CNRS-UPJV), Université de Picardie Jules Verne, Amiens, France.
2
Université Côte d'Azur, INRA, CNRS, ISA, Sophia Antipolis, France.

Abstract

Aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA) is a low-abundance intracellular enzyme that plays a key role in the last stage of glycoproteins degradation, and whose deficiency leads to human aspartylglucosaminuria, a lysosomal storage disease. Surprisingly, high amounts of AGA-like proteins are secreted in the venom of two phylogenetically distant hymenopteran parasitoid wasp species, Asobara tabida (Braconidae) and Leptopilina heterotoma (Cynipidae). These venom AGAs have a similar domain organization as mammalian AGAs. They share with them key residues for autocatalysis and activity, and the mature α- and β-subunits also form an (αβ)2 structure in solution. Interestingly, only one of these AGAs subunits (α for AtAGA and β for LhAGA) is glycosylated instead of the two subunits for lysosomal human AGA (hAGA), and these glycosylations are partially resistant to PGNase F treatment. The two venom AGAs are secreted as fully activated enzymes, they have a similar aspartylglucosaminidase activity and are both also efficient asparaginases. Once AGAs are injected into the larvae of the Drosophila melanogaster host, the asparaginase activity may play a role in modulating their physiology. Altogether, our data provide new elements for a better understanding of the secretion and the role of venom AGAs as virulence factors in the parasitoid wasps' success.

PMID:
28742131
PMCID:
PMC5524358
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0181940
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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