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Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2017 Sep;19(9):61. doi: 10.1007/s11920-017-0807-5.

Genetics of Schizophrenia: Ready to Translate?

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychiatric Genetics Research Group, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychiatric Genetics Research Group, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. acorvin@tcd.ie.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

This is an era where we have significantly advanced the understanding of the genetic architecture of schizophrenia. In this review, we consider how this knowledge may translate into advances that will improve patient care.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than a hundred loci each making a small contribution to illness risk. Meta-analysis of copy number variants (CNVs) in the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) dataset has confirmed that some variants have a moderate or large impact on risk, although these are rare in the population. Genome sequencing advances allow a much more comprehensive evaluation of genomic variation. We describe the key findings from whole exome studies to date. These studies are happening against a backdrop of growing understanding of the regulation and expression of genes and better functional tools to investigate molecular mechanisms in model systems. We provide an overview of how recent approaches in schizophrenia genetics are converging and consider how they could impact on diagnostics, the development of personalized medicine, and drug discovery.

KEYWORDS:

Genomics; Mutations; Polygene score; Schizophrenia; Translational medicine

PMID:
28741255
DOI:
10.1007/s11920-017-0807-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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